Squintin‘, lookin‘, doin‘.

Amos Dudley's blog about level design, environment modeling, and 3D.


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n Shakes of a Lamb's Tail

27 Feb 2015 | self-Amos

My friend Zak likes to advocate the use of self-imposed consequences as a methodology for motivating oneself to action. For example, committing to burn (or better, donate) a thousand dollars if an important task isn’t completed. Monetary consequences are convenient because they easily scale to the importance of the task. I like this idea - especially if you have a friend who is willing to hold you to your commitments, usually by holding onto your money.

Ideas swirl around in my mind about projects I’d like to accomplish. Especially a larger scale work I could create, that would in some way crystallize my artistic and philosophical feelings up to this point. An issue with long-term personal projects is that the goal is so far in the future that it’s intangible. So, I’ve decided to set a deadline for that project, for 9 months from today. If I don’t have an interactive prototype by that date, I’m committing to donate 100 hours of volunteer time to the NYCACC.

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A Minimal Mendel, Postmortem

The Prusa i2 design of 3D printer I had built with my friend Eric in 2013 was a great little 3D printer that can be built with parts from the hardware store, but I felt that the design compromised too much. The triangular prism shaped frame of the i2 meant that it was extremely difficult to make the machine perfectly square on all three axes. The Z axis was also over-constrained, which was a fundamental flaw in the design that made any eccentricity in the Z drive screws apparent as small ridges on prints. There are a huge number of 3D printer designs out there; RepRaps and all the variations on that principle. I wanted a machine that would use the costly parts from my Prusa i2, and transfer them to a simpler, stronger frame, while solving a number of other problems I found with the i2.